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20100930
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erotic services categories in sites outside of the united states, including canada. ms. mcdougal might be able to speak more effectively to that. there are a number of issues country by country, as well as legal issues for that. i can tell you that something along the order of 97% of our viewers in use is within the united states and canada. >> can a united states person access aoreign craigslist site? >> anyone anywhere can access the craigslist site anywhere. >> so what is the significance of taking down the site in the united states? >> the site in the u.s. was set up as part of an arrangement with a series of attorneys general last year. i think the intent was to do a number of things, capture credit-card intermission, captor phone information. we decided on september 3 to remove that category, and again have no intention of restoring it. >> if i am in washington d.c., accessing the canadian side, can i advertise services that would be available in washington, d.c on the canadian side? >> yes, you could, but there were be simply no value whatsoever, because the individuals who view
in antarctica. with global warming and the increasing opening of the northwest passage, the arctic, canada is debating refurbishing its fleet. the russians have come over and planted flags on the north pole. this is an area of future interest for all three nations. but the coast guard is not getting the resources it needs to recapitalize that icebreaker fleet. what will happen there? will we just be shut out of the arctic and have to depend on the canadiens to get there? >> not at all. because guard cutter healy is above alaska, asserting our sovereignty, mapping out the ocean floor, and working with the canadiens up there. but you bring a great question. that is why i got back two weeks ago from a trip up there. we were conducting something called arctic crossroads, the third year of a project we are doing to exercise of their in the greater open water that we have to test our coastguard assets and our resources to see what the might -- the right mix might be of their -- might be up there. we found a cruise ship that had run aground on an uncharted rock in the canadian waters. canada did
canada's work. the first question is what is the price of a liter of petrol. the answer is 1 pound 15. ed miliband, dave miliband, and ed balls got that one right. diane abbott did not answer on principle because she does not drive at all. into move on before we get this debate. we had some quick fire questions to get a quick response as to where people stand on issues. diane abbott will answer this for. would you describe yourself as a socialist and what does that mean to you? >> i would describe myself as a socialist. if it means anything, it is being able to bring society together to make it more equal, to make it more just, and always making sure that the voice was have that voice. >> yes, it means that what we do together is greater than what we can do on our own. it is a very simple idea. social speaks to the basic part of who we are, that we get our identity and our freedom for what we rebel to do together. >> yes, we need to be willing to criticize the injustices of absolutism. we need to be willing to say that there are injustices with which we want to deal. >> yes, i joined labo
composed of the united states, sweden, norway, denmark, and canada who would care? what would be the point? the whole point of those bodies is to confront those countries whose behavior is problematic. you have to have the human rights violators in the human rights council, otherwisethere is no point. i think that is with the idea of some standards for performance should come in for who gets to sit on what body at the u.n. host: the united nations came into existence in 1945. the currentecretary general of the u.n. is -- albert on our republican line, go ahead. obama: why haven't the administration pulled the plug on colonialism? he had a shot to do his legacy in foreign policy but he has not spoken out against colonialism? could you explain that to me? guest: there is not much of it left. there are few countries left in the world under colonialism. he has talked to the united nations about the need to fd new ways of cooperation against transnational cooperative the threats. i think his argument at the united nations has been -- has been pretty compelling. his argument at the un, i think,
my -- the gingrich, the howard dean canada. we both like ideas, he is a medical doctor. i'm a historian. we like debating. i think part of us is fund -- i have a similar relationship with robert reischauer. we like bouncing things off of each other like ideas. >> your president in 2013. explain how you would structure the white house. which you surround yourself with? what kind of administration would you want to have? >> that's a very subtle and important question. i've gone back, reading a lot about lincoln. he comes into a very tiny government and has to fight the civil war. his background as an administrator is that he has been all lawyer. lincoln had the advantage that he was the only true genius to was the president and his learning curve was unbelievable. it is clear that government these days is dysfunctional. it does not work. it starts with your possession of the white house. i will tell you one story that bothers me. i was very fortunate to spend 20 years in the legislative branch. the bush administration was very generous and allowed me to work as a volunteer i
on you to keep up the good work, to keep knocking on doors, keep dialing phones as to give canada's across the country or support. -- candidates across the country your support. on behalf of the national republican congressional committee, thank you for all of you have done in the name of those ideals. i urge you to continue your efforts. with your help, we will win in november. thank you, very much. i hope you have a good evening. [applause] >> honestly, the chairman says it better than i ever could. i will just thank you on his behalf. thank you for everything that you have done. thank you for your help in special auctions and in house races across the country. definitely keep up the good work. do not hesitate to come to us to let us know what else we can do to help you be as affected as we can the -- effective as we can be. [applause] >> ok, since we are talking a little bit about taxes, i would like to mention that our dallas chapter has something coming up. those of you that my fault-find your way in the great state of texas, ♪ find your way to the great state of -- find yo
countries, including great britain, australia, canada, the netherlands, and israel, allow open service by lesbian and gay troops. we have no greater allies than great britain, austria, canada, and israel, and none of these countries, not one, reports morale or recruitment problems. at least nine of these countries have deployed their forces alongside american troops in operation iraqi freedom, and at least 12 of these nations are allowing open service and are currently fighting alongside u.s. troopsn afghanistan. there's a cost involved in our current policy. according to a 2005 g.a.o. report, american taxpayers spend more than $30 million each year to train replacement for gay troops discharged under the don't ask, don't policy. the total costs reported since the statute was implemented, according to g.a.o., has been nearly $200 million and that doesn't count the administrative and legal costs associated with investigations and hearings. the military schooling of gay troops, such as pilot training and linguist training. we are losing highly-skilled troops to this policy. according to
recovery. what other areas to the canada is think we need to challenge the media consensus in order to run the argument for the margin the biggest political problem is looking into an aisle at the financial system relation. we have to set forward a credible alternative. we need to pay back the deficit. more should come from taxes, because times like this, if you have cuts that we're looking at,, and a difficult argument that this should not give the nhs increases right now. i would give inflationary increases. >> it is right to say that we should challenge the media consensus. i would challenge on this. this leadership election is a race between the two miliband brothers. we want to say to you is that there is -- it will not be the media decides the election, but the labour party. >> the most dangerous media consensus, the national minimum wage, saving on our national health service, improving schools faster than anywhere, the greatest danger for the labour party in the future britain is that we have stagnant wages when we're more confident than we were in 1997 and we have to depend that w
have less opportunity to participate? you cannot go in and hold up signs for your favorite canada and call people of the phone and tell them how to vote if you are in prison. >> if they are in jail, they do not have an opportunity to participate. >> so what of the plain language argument? >> the courts chooses to examine the legislative history, so we covered the legislative history in our brief as well. >> i would like to present you with a hypothetical. suppose there is a state that has never had a law like this before and the legislature says that we cannot have a poll tax anymore and we cannot have literacy tests anymore, but there is a really good way to keep racial minorities from having their fair share of the political process. we will pass a felon disenfranchisement law for the express purpose of making sure that we have fewer minority voters. is that covered by section 2 of the voting rights acts? >> this is pretty much the situation. they simply look to equal protection of the 14th amendment and they spoke to discrimination. whether there is intentional discrimination,
, canada, australia have undergone very significant reorganizations in the way they have overseen, leased, regulated, enforced safety and environmental protection in the offshore environment. did you look before you made some of your own proposals? it is unfair to ask a cabinet officer to talk about how seriously you might have considered moving something outside your own agency but has that come up? as the administration been involved in making judgments about proposals made by the former secretary and others about the functions and revenue raising and that they do not belong in the same department with the regulatory enterprises? that is a long list and i will hope that we get through a big -- a good bit of it. i would invite you to respond to any or as much of it as we can get through. >> absolutely, let me just say that there is no question that you should not ask me. you should ask about things we have done and things we will do in the future. those are all good questions that u.s.. with respect to the cultural mms, there is a clear statement i made when i hired and appointed with th
of fourth largest nation by a total area ranking behind russia and canada and just above or below china. chuck on independent line. caller: good morning. i think the problem with america, our politicians, they support the wealthy and not the american people. they support the corporations. and they want to talk about getting back to the constitution. they are actually doing the opposite. they are supporting the very few. host: so i am going to do the same with the. as america's strength its constitution? turn your complaints on its head and tell us what america's core competency is. caller: the strength is the middle class and for the country to thrive the middle class has to prosper. for the middle-class to prosper, we got to have jobs. for the last 30 years we have been basically on an outsourcing gimmick for the corporations and the wealthy to profit more and they don't really care about the american people. i don't think they are patriots and i don't think they christians. host: your estimation america's core strength is the strength of its middle class and for you the prescription t
may leave those lines as they do in canada because they cannot survive the line. that is what i can see happening. >> i think we need to think outside the box. we don't do that and nothing government. in my personal of view, i think the federal government may well be in the wrong business with regard to health care. one of the things we need to have a discussion and debate about is what level of universal coverage is appropriate, affordable, and sustainable over time. in my view, that is preventative wellness and catastrophic protection with an option to obtain more if you want. i think we need to think about how we can end up moving toward a system that is more appropriate, affordable, and sustainable while maintaining competition and the ultimate delivery to the private sector because right now the system we have now, we have made more promises than we will be able to deliver on. that is the simple truth. >> you see a lot of projections of future medicaid and medicare costs. it seems there should be a largererror bar because you know the formula. you don't know how medical technol
the c-span will read my tweak is they do not contain any reference to canada's. -- cannabis. my question to you is whether or not where marijuana it's an overall drug trade? guest: there is a robust debate going on in this country today about where precisely we draw the line, which substances are controlled and which are not. i will tell you that the marijuana trade is the economic engine of a mexican drug trafficking, and there are thousands of people who have been murdered, who at suffered needlessly because of the violence that is associated with the marijuana trade its toll. -- itself. the argument that is typically advanced is that if we could legalize marijuana and took the profit out of it, when we make all the problems go away? the answer to that question is a resounding no. the people engaged in the trade will not just off the residence and go back into corporate life. but they are career criminals. we will fight them whether it is over the marijuana trade or something else. host: 10 has this point. the product value would be destroyed overnight. the economy cannot afford a blac
look at some of the other countries and the policies that they have, excuse me. you can look at canada, united kingdom, australia, for example. they set up a scoring point system that reward people for being able to contribute to the host country. now, i have long said that the immigration policy in the united states of america should be designed to enhance the economic, social and cultural well-being of the united states. that should be actually the policy of any sovereign nation in the world, should establish an immigration policy for the purposes of enhancing the economic, social and cultural well-being that have particular sovereign state. in this case, it's the united states of america. we should also understand that one of the essential pillars of american exceptionalism is the rule of law. if we have contempt for the rule of law, if we have some of the highest profile people in america openly speak about hiring illegals to take care of their home and at the same time advocate for the dream act which is amnesty for a specific class of people, we regard -- reward for illegal behav
countries, including great btain, australia, canada, the netherlands, and israel, allow open service by lesbian and gay troops. we have no greater allies than great britain, australia, canada, and israel, and none of these countries, not one, reports morale or recruitment problems. at least nine of these countries have deployedheir forces alongside american troops in operation iraqi freedom, and at least 12 of these nations are allowing open service and are currently fighting alongside u.s. troops in afghanistan. there's a cost involved in our current policy. according to a 2005 g.a.o. report, american taxpayers spend more than $30 milon each year to train replacement for gay troops discharged under the n't ask, d't policy. the total costs reported since the statute was implemented, according to g.a.o., has been nearly $200 million and that doesn't count the administrative and legal costs associatedith investigations and hearings. the militar schooling of gay troops, such as pilot training and linguist training. we are losing highly-skilled troops to this policy. cording to the g.a.o
their service now. at least 28 countries, including great britain, australia, canada, the netherlands, and israel, allow open service by lesbian and gay troops. we have no greater allies than great britain, australia, canada, and israel, and none of these countries, not one, reports morale or recruitment problems. at least nine of these countries have deployed their forces alongside american troops in operation iraqi freedom, and at least 12 of these nations are allowing open service and are currently fighting alongside u.s. troops in afghanistan. there's a cost involved in our current policy. according to a 2005 g.a.o. report, american taxpayers spend more than $30 million each year to train replacement for gay troops discharged under the don't ask, don't policy. the total costs reported since the statute was implemented, according to g.a.o., has been nearly $200 million and that doesn't count the administrative and legal costs associated with investigations and hearings. the military schooling of gay troops, such as pilot training and linguist training. we are losing highly-skilled
running for office. it is unheard of in great britain or canada for any party to ever think about changing the law to keep its competition off the bell. and the britain anyone can get on about -- to keep them off the ballot in this country. in canada but it only takes 100 signatures. it does not occur to people in most countries that is legitimate for two parties to get together and keep competition off the ballot. host: for those who tried to keep the parties off the ballots, what is the main reasoning? guest: it depends on whether they are talking honestly or not. if you want an example of an honest comment, i was at a georgia state legislative hearing once and a legislator on the elections committee said, i don't want no damn libertarian running against me. i appreciated that. when the law came before judges, the judges will not say something like that. they constantly tell us we are in danger of overcrowded ballots that will cause the utter confusion. the truth is, we suffer from under-crowded ballots. i have been tracking state legislative candidacies for 20 years. every election year
of other countries like canada, israel, italy, in allowing citizens who are openly gay or lesbian to serve in their country -- to serve their country and in the military, because after all, it is a matter of fairness. in march, my wife and our two daughters and i were deeply touched when we accompanied my colleague john lewis to georgia and many other congressional colleagues on a trip organized by the faith in politics institute. we went to selma, alabama for a memorial, and we saw firsthand the bridge that was made famous by bloody sunday. we saw with our own eyes the highway where congressman lewis and others, including pioneers like dr. martin luther king himself, marched peacefully into the ports of inequality. my family can only imagine how they suffered as the alabama highway patrolman answered their orderly procession with billy clubs and handcuffs. as a non-american who did not grow up in the jim crow era, there is no way i can ever understand the pain and injustice these champions of justice suffered for a righteous cause, nor can i know exactly the suffering of the service man o
europe were diverted to canada. once an airliner starts out over the pond with a point of no return, there had to be some complications. was there anything that turned out to be a problem? i know it was not simple. was theemedy to divert as many of those to canada as you could? did you turnome back? were there any glitches in that or someone got close to running out of fuel on the way across the land? >> those routes across the land in in the ocean are structured. they are required to have a certain amount of fuel in the event of emergency. they would have either gone back to europe or we have greenland, iceld, and the canadian provinces all the way down. i was not concerned about an aircraft getting to a place to land at all. i knew that our procedures in setting of the north atlantic tracks in this case provide for that contingency. >> the town of gander in newfouland, there is an interesting story on that. they hav5000 people. 10,000 people landed that day on 9/11. [laughter] the town doubled in size. the peoplen gander to all of these people into their houses. it was not like th
'll be surprised at how well the economy responds. now, canada did this in the 1990's. they are talking about it today in germany. there are examples we can look to to say, yes, we can give confidence to people, once we give them assurances that we will behave responsibly as leadership. so that is the way to do it in my opinion. failure to do it means we model along and we will have much slower growth. >> ok. our next question will address the sustainability of the american economy. the housing bubble is not the first and only bubble our economy has seen. government into many instances has been using a device by corporations to pass favorable laws that benefits each industry respectively. can the united states economy and tax base sustain the negligent behavior of some lawmakers who did not fully understand the economic consequences of the laws they pass and may be unaware of the law's effects on local communities resulting in economic disaster? >> the answer is, yes it can. it has in the past, and it will atgain. i have long said, and i am not in politics in that sense at all, but here is my
. it is unheard of in great britain or canada for any party to ever think about changing the law to keep its competition off the bell. and the britain anyone can get on about -- to keep them off the ballot in this country. in canada but it only takes 100 signatures. it does not occur to people in most countries that is legitimate for two parties to get together and keep competition off the ballot. host: for those who tried to keep the parties off the ballots, what is the main reasoning? guest: it depends on whether they are talking honestly or not. if you want an example of an honest comment, i was at a georgia state legislative hearing once and a legislator on the elections committee said, i don't want no damn libertarian running against me. i appreciated that. when the law came before judges, the judges will not say something like that. they constantly tell us we are in danger of overcrowded ballots that will cause the uer confusion. the truth is, we suffer from under-crowded ballots. i have been tracking state legislative candidacies for 20 years. every election year between 30% and 35% o
and e.u. on exchange of information. we work very closely with canada and mexico, our two neighbors. and so there is a huge amount of interaction at the international level but all designed to minimize the risk that a terrorist could either enter the united states or be plotting somewhere else to injure u.s. interests. >> senator mueller. >> senator, we've realized for a number of years, certainly before my time, that our success is in large part dependent on working with our counterparts overseas. we have over 60 legal offices in embassies around the world which we use as liaisons to our counterparts. we have since the 1970's a national academy in which we've brought in state and local law enforcement for a 10-week period for training. we have for many years included our foreign counterparts, whether it be from iraq or pakistan or afghanistan as part of those classes in an effort to educate persons as to what the f.b.i. does but also how the f.b.i. does it and what we do not do. in those relatively small ways but i think important ways we have developed persons that provide the rel
, including great britain, australia, canada, the netherlands, and israel, allow open service by lesbian and gay troops. we have no greater allies than great britain, australia, canada, and israel, and none of these countries, not one, reports morale or recruitment problems. at least nine of these countries have deployed their forces alongside american troops in operation iraqi freedom, and at least 12 of these nions are allowing open service and are currently fighting alongside u.s. troops in afghanistan. there's a cost involved in our current policy. according to a 2005 g.a.o. report, american taxpayers spend more than $30illion each year to train replacement for gay troops discharged under the don't ask, don't policy. the total costs reported since the statute was implemented, according to g.a.o., has been nearly $200 million and that doesn't count the administrative and legal costs associated with investigations and hearings. the military schooling of gay troops, such as pilot training and linguist training. we are losing highly-skilled troops to this policy. according to the g.a.o.,
neighbors to the north, canada, those kinds of systems work less well. it is very hard for us to go to a sovereign nation and say abide by this cap we might do it with canada. we will never do it with mexico and we will not do it with places like china. please comment on recycling, when and how does it work and not work. what does it cost? we have fortunately heard this afternoon from the trash me man, my colleague van benjamin, who published a work on the myths of recycling. i will do my best to summarize him in very few words. when does it work? not very often. how does it work? not very well. what does it cost? a lot. pretty well summarizes everything there is to know about recycling. it works when -- back to my concluding remarks -- it works when it is profitable. so aluminum works pretty well because in fact it makes economic sense. how does it work? with private incentives of people saying, hey, it is worth something to me to recycle my aluminum cans. it does not work when we end up spending far more -- and i do not mean just in the more money because money is just a way of me
to ask a closing question, which we do invite the candidates to use. canada is, you will have one minute and 15 seconds for your answer, and the closing question actually comes in from a viewer, who once in a tonight how does your previous history of entwinement make you want the best candidates for the u.s. senate, and you will have the first response, mr. lamontage. but i think the moderator and the union leader for endorsing my campaign for the united states senate. i am probably -- i know i am the most experienced person here. i have worked as a business lawyer for over 20 years but i have worked in the private sector as a chairman of a credit union. i have dealt with health care and the issues we're facing. critical issues. i have the expertise to be ready on day one to serve you. our nation is in crisis. we need to nominate and elect the person who is ready on day one to advance the conservative agenda which washington is really crying out for, when the police and constitutional principles, of limited government, of a balanced budget, fiscal responsibility, and national security, t
tuesday looking at airline safety. the association represents 54,000 pilots in the u.s. and canada. members met in washington, d.c., to discuss safety screening technologies, pilot training, and security and safety challenges all cargo pilots face. one forum focused on recent cutbacks in pilot training programs. this is just under an hour and a half. >> captain chuck from denver, the united pilot, chairs the training group. chuck will moderate this panel titled training the professional airline pilot today and tomorrow. great pleasure, chuck. >> thank you for that introduction, linda, and thanks to you and captain kay forgiving the human factors training group an opportunity to speak to this very distinguished audience. i may be terribly biased, but i present to you a panel that represents to me some of the brightest minds on the subject of airline pilot training and professional itch. as we all know, in the last 18 months, the tenor in the air necessitated events that truly are out there advocating for a transportation system. safety values of the pilots it represents dictates tha
and canada are encountered numerous i e d's or improvised -- helmand and kandahar encounter numerous improvised explosive devices. of the question is are these fatalities from roadside dime -- roadside bombs assigned the u.s. is making inroads in places they previously did not have success. a brigadier who commands ground forces and helmand province says -- taliban fighters suffered submitting casualties when they battle coalition troops. then they peppered the fields and orchards with ied's during the night. when that happens, the taliban tend to fall back, and such minefields are a last-ditch effort to hold off defeat, they say. the enemy would be glad to box off and put an area of mine field all the way around us. we will get back to your calls in a moment. "usa today" has a graphic, improvised explosive devices on the rise. of 2008's august versus 2009 and this year. ied incidents back in august of 2008, 4000 -- 439. last year, 1067. august of this year, more than 1200 attacks in afghanistan. montana. a bill on our democrats line. good morning. caller: good morning. host: curb co
and consolidate the democratic vote so that drove across canada take much of that. kendrick meek can consolidate -- so that charlie crist does not take much of that. the kendrick meek also needs to consolidate the republican vote. independence made break the vote here. -- independents may break the vote here. you have obviously the most popular incumbent in harry reid, with the senate majority leader, but he is running against someone who has a not a lot of experience on the campaign trail and is prone to engage in her mouth before her brain. but the thing about nevada, there is another option on the ballot. it is called "none of the above." if you do not like your candidate, you can vote for no one. that might actually save leader reid. independents are not breaking strongly in the new direction. this will be closed until a election day. host: let's go to libby in nantucket on the independent line. do you have a specific race that you are watching? caller: we are here for the summer. the we reside in connecticut. are you doing all of this behind a desk in washington? and on to chris matthews be
had no idea what was really going on in canada are -- in kandahar. that was a big alarm. there was a very vigorous and critique of our intelligence work in afghanistan last january raising these same questions. the disturbing thing was that he was there for eight years and we do not know that much more about the people of afghanistan or that much more about the power brokers than we did when we first went into afghanistan in 2002. we wrote this really gloomy report and we did not count on bob woodward publishing it in "the washington post." but he did. this change to the debate in afghanistan in the united states to a degree, combined with some other unfortunate news. the afghan presidential election in august-september 2009. those two events contributed to the white house reviewing or going back over their strategy for afghanistan. whenever you do a strategic plan, used her with a list of planning assumptions. if any of the internet to be wrong -- when every do a strategic plan, you start out with a list of planning assumptions. if any of them turn out to be wrong, then
. they added those two in and canada against him. i can tell you in our visit to the beef connection. we were able to confirm that he is not the only person in louisiana who great -- who drinks that brand of vodka. the key fact that they rely on is a notation that someone at this table had two absoluts. they submitted that to use the they could throw it in the next for a refusal of a federal judge. -- recusal. the house suggests that such meals were intended to influence him and get him to help with bonds. they would get bonds. now they concede that he never set them too high or too low. they did not cite any bonds that were invalid. this guy did not even deserve one. after our deposition, the house had to concede this point. you will hear from both of them that they did not believe judge porteous was influenced by neil's or gifts in the bonds. there was an of beef for bonds. they have both testified that the judge regularly it rejected bond fund them and could not be bought. he will hear from the criminal court, mr. griffin, that he said any representation made by then the check out with the
that extended a little bit beyond that since then, so, you know, all of europe, canada, australia, japan, very, very few of these countries have experienced -- a lot of them have seen some increase in inequality, though some of them have seen none at all, probably because government has pushed back against some of the economic trends rather than reinforcing them, which is what happened here. host: how do you compare the united states to a country like germany, where they've looked like they're coming out of this recession ok, but they haven't -- they rely heavily on exports. they're not importing a lot. their consumers are not buying a lot, which many say is not an economic -- you can't keep doing that, and that they also -- they have a steer measures, austerity measures that they've put in place, but you can't compare germany to the united states because germany didn't have a housing bubble. and so perhaps it is our economic times. guest: well, again, i agree with you. every country is different. but it's not just germany. you can run down the list. and there's information about this in our b
this. he should back the canada. but he has his own supporters, many of them republicans who feel that he have the right to run. >> this is the last vestiges of the republican party, and i kept this because, this is a republican symbol from south africa. my friend from south africa brought me this back. the only vestige i cap. and i did keep one of these, which is the poster we had made up for mccain and palin in 2008. these were made up for $1 apiece. the f-15 hundred of them made and they went in a couple of hours. they were gone. and we actually 14 mccain and pale and here in virginia beach. -- we actually won for mccain and palin here in virginia beach. >> it president obama carried this district, then his policies are and joined in this debate. glenn did not vote for the health care bill, but they want to use that against them. in some way, it is viewed as a referendum on the president's policies. it may say something about obama is chances in virginia in 2012. >> our local content vehicles are traveling the country, visiting communities and congressional districts as we look
states, but not exclusive of other population. we imagined it would look a bit like canada and the united states, france and germany, where people would be able to cross the border. the israelis could be able to shop in palestinian areas, palestinians coming over to the israeli side -- and it has been repeated recently -- palestinians are not opposed to jews living in a palestinian state. we recognize the jewish people have religious and historic ties that will be the palestinian state. there is no objection to the jews living in the palestinian state. are they going to live in there as a palestinian citizen, as israeli citizens, under what framework? this vision of two states with multi-ethnic population is moving back and forth, this has taken a beating since i was in negotiations. over the course of all the violence that has taken recently, specifically in israel, over two exclusive populations. i think there needs to be a conclusion in a two state solution that allows both jews and palestinians to have access to both countries. the more interaction there will be, the more peace will b
until eight months ago. the construction worker from from canada, mass., and international students. >> i do not know the answer. they're working in the connecticut and that's what happens. you get a job and they bring in their own people. this is an issue that concerned me. immigration in this country is an issue that needs to be discussed in a very serious way. we had programs called guest worker programs. do you know what those are? if the company says we need a certain type of employee and we cannot talk -- cannot find that type of employee in the u.s., and we'd go to russia or someplace else or engineers or scientists. resorts use that for a variety of reasons. he will be shocked to know that some years ago from a year in the state of vermont, apparently we do not have people who can ski instructors. did you know that? we have no one here who knows anything about skis. therefore, correct me if i'm wrong, but we bring in people from all over the world to be ski instructors. is that correct? [laughter] those programs for guest workers are very often exploited by employers. why di
made as the canada. 4.5 million small businesses and individuals will be eligible to immediately write off more expenses. that may benefit ruth, who is opening another restaurant in alexandria, virginia. 2 million self-employed americans will be able to receive a new deduction for health insurance. we will be increasing the tax break for anyone looking to open up a business. that is a $10,000 deduction. it can help with discouraging startup costs. future prosperity depends on whether regreting an environment in which folks can take new ideas for products to market and generate new business. that is not just a challenge of government. it is a challenge that requires businesses, leaders, universities, and others across this country. the second thing this bill does is we are going to make more loans available to small business. right now, there is the waiting list for sba loans. these are people who are ready to hire or expand, who have been approved by their banks, who are waiting for this legislation to pass. when i sign this bill, their weight will be over. will be over.it [applause] v
this on purpose so people do not know products' buying meat coming in from australia, mexico, and canada. i live on a very limited income, so i tend to buy the cheaper products. i was applying -- buying 1-pound chubbs of meat. there were some pretty gross things in there. i ask the person who worked there, and she told me, do not tell anyone i told you this because i could lose my job, but do not buy that product, it is garbage. guest: country of origin labels -- there are requirements. in a package of meat that i bought over the weekend, there were four countries listed. host: really, and they mix it all together? ground beef does not necessarily come from one count? really? -- from one cow? guest: part of the story of globalization is the globalization of our food supply. i think there is still a question, the side of clear the bridge is -- which could be a legitimate issue. there is also a question about whether or not the last place where the food passes through is labeled. sometimes where it is grown, raised is put on the label, but not where it is packaged. you do not know the trail of pla
. the problem is that we had no idea what was really going on in canada are -- in kandahar. that was a big alarm. there was a very vigorous and critique of our intelligence work in afghanistan last january raising these same questions. the disturbing thing was that he was there for eight years and we do not know that much more about the people of afghanistan or that much more about the power brokers than we did when we first went into afghanistan in 2002. we wrote this really gloomy report and we did not count on bob woodward publishing it in "the washington post." but he did. this change to the debate in afghanistan in the united states to a degree, combined with some other unfortunate news. the afghan presidential election in august-september 2009. those two events contributed to the white house reviewing or going back over their strategy for afghanistan. whenever you do a strategic plan, used her with a list of planning assumptions. if any of the internet to be wrong -- when every do a strategic plan, you start out with a list of planning assumptions. if any of them turn out to be wrong, then
workers were from canada, massachusetts, new york, international students running the hotels. >> on one part of that issue, we are a nation, and vermonters, i know are working in massachusetts and connecticut and that's what happens. contractors get a job and bring in their own people. i will tell you an issue we have with that that does concern me very much. immigration in this couldn't vi a serious issue and we have to deal with it in a comprehensive way. i voted against the immigration bill that came up last time primarily for one reason. you touched on that reason. we have programs called guest workers programs. guest workers programs are, a company says, we need a certain type of employee. and we can't find that employee in the united states. therefore we have to go to warsaw or someplace else. high tech companies use this for engineers and scientists. resort areas use it for a variety of reasons. you will be shocked to know, some years ago, here in the state of vermont, apparently we do not have people who can be ski instructors. did you know that? we just don't have enough people
, that was not happening. all these efforts combined will culminate at the acao summit in montreal, canada up where we hope to make our work for strengthening international standards for aviation security into an actual resolution the international community through acao and applicable to the entire system. it is important to note that in addition to acao the airline industry and the carriers themselves have been with us every step of the way. we have collaborated closely with the united states and international airline and airport straight associations -- trade associations and airline ceo's, shortly after christmas day, to explain what security enhancements needed to go in place immediately, but what we were striving for in the following weeks. i personally met with all of these leaders, and i also met with the heads of the international air travel association, and also with the ata. they have voiced strong support for the coordinated international approach that we have begun and that will be expressed, we hope, this fall at the acao general assembly. through that, it is clear that our potential for coll
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